5 Best Running Shoes For Peroneal Tendonitis | My Top Picks | 2021

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Are you tired of tendon pain in your ankles and feet? Has exercising become increasingly more difficult for you? Are you looking for the best running shoes for peroneal tendonitis?

Well, I can assure you, you have come to the right place to find all that you are looking for! With over ten years of running experience, I am very familiar with tendon injuries- or Peroneal Tendonitis. It can make running, or any exercise, feel quite difficult.

Peroneal tendonitis is a common runner’s affliction affecting athletes like long-distance runners. It is characterized as a tendon injury that causes pain on the outside of the ankle.

This condition often develops over time as a result of overuse, for instance – if your foot doesn’t hit the ground in a good position when walking or running, it creates more stress on the tendon.

Peroneal tendonitis can make it hard to do many everyday activities, such as walking or climbing stairs. However, it’s important to stay active and work alongside a physical therapist as exercise is one of the best treatments.

Finding proper supportive and cushioned footwear can be a great relief to ensure your ankles and feet get the support they need. It also may be necessary to get fitted for corrective inserts for your shoes to reduce stress on your tendons.

In this article, I’m going to take a closer look at the best running shoes for peroneal tendonitis. I will also explain what to look for when buying running shoes for this condition. 

If you’re in a hurry and want my top pick, I compared several pairs and recommend the Asics Gel-Nimbus 22 because of their comfortable, stable, and impressively supportive design.

Read on to discover the following shoes that stood out and made this list. 

My Top 3 Picks

Product
Asics Gel-Nimbus 22
Brooks Glycerin 18
Mizuno Wave Rider 24
Image
ASICS Men's Gel-Nimbus 22 Shoes, 10.5, Glacier Grey/Graphite Grey
Brooks Glycerin 18 Valerian/Jewel/Cantaloupe 7.5 B (M)
Mizuno Men's Wave Rider 24 Running Shoe, Castlerock-Phantom, 11 D US
Shipping
-
-
Best For
Best Overall
Most Comfortable
Best For Wide Feet
Weight
1.85 lbs
1.05 lbs
0.6 lbs
Absorbs Impact
Product
Asics Gel-Nimbus 22
Image
ASICS Men's Gel-Nimbus 22 Shoes, 10.5, Glacier Grey/Graphite Grey
Shipping
-
Best For
Best Overall
Weight
1.85 lbs
Absorbs Impact
Product
Brooks Glycerin 18
Image
Brooks Glycerin 18 Valerian/Jewel/Cantaloupe 7.5 B (M)
Shipping
Best For
Most Comfortable
Weight
1.05 lbs
Absorbs Impact
Product
Mizuno Wave Rider 24
Image
Mizuno Men's Wave Rider 24 Running Shoe, Castlerock-Phantom, 11 D US
Shipping
-
Best For
Best For Wide Feet
Weight
0.6 lbs
Absorbs Impact

5 Best Running Shoes For Peroneal Tendonitis

1. Asics Gel-Nimbus 22 – Best Overall 

Asics Gel-Nimbus 22
  • Rearfoot and Forefoot GEL Technology Cushioning System - Attenuates shock during impact and toe-off phases, and allows movement in multiple planes as the foot transitions through the gait cycle.
  • Trusstic System technology - Reduces the weight of the sole unit while retaining the structural integrity of the shoe.
  • SpevaFoam 45 Lasting - Employs 45 degree full length SpevaFoam 45 lasting material for a soft platform feel and improved comfort.

The Asics Gel-Nimbus are comfortable, stable, and impressively supportive. Featuring both rear and forward gel cushioning, these running shoes offer an incredible amount of comfort for those suffering from peroneal tendonitis.

An amazing feature of this shoe is they include a lightweight sole that offers both support and stability. It is crucial that your running shoes have a higher heel drop for peroneal tendonitis.

And, with the Asics, I find that the heel comfortably rolls right into toe-off- avoiding an abrasive heel strike. Lastly, due to the gel cushioning in these shoes, you experience effective shock absorbency.

What I Like…

  • Gel cushioning
  • Solid rubber outsole
  • Lightweight 
  • Super comfortable
  • 10-13mm heel drop

What I Don’t Like…

  • Sizes run small
  • Durability concerns

Similar Product: ASICS Men’s Gel-Cumulus 22 Running Shoes

2. Brooks Glycerin 18 – Best For Comfort

Brooks Glycerin 18
  • THIS WOMEN'S SHOE IS FOR: The Glycerin 18 is perfect for runners who think there's no such thing as too much cushioning. The upper enhances comfort by perfectly balancing stretch and structure.
  • SUPPORT AND CUSHION: Provides neutral support while offering the maximum amount of cushioning. Ideal for road running, cross training, the gym or wherever you might want to take them! Predecessor: Glycerin 17.
  • SUPER-SOFT CUSHIONING: Increased DNA LOFT super-soft cushioning allows for even more extreme softness, without losing responsiveness or durability, while the OrthoLite sockliner provides premium step-in comfort.

Alright, let’s be real for a moment. Peroneal Tendonitis can be really painful, and I don’t know about you, but I desire the most comfortable shoe when I am working through this awful condition.

Luckily for -all of us- the Brooks Glycerin 18 is extremely comfortable, and like the Asics, is delightfully lightweight so it won’t weigh you down.

These shoes provide neutral support which is excellent for peroneal tendonitis. Neutral support aids in realigning your gait and in turn reduces your overall level of pain.

My absolute favorite feature of the Brooks is the DNA-LOFT cushioning, which provides amazing comfort and excellent shock absorption– without compromising on stability and support! Win/win, right!? Finally, the Glycerin 18 provides a tough rubber outsole that is surprisingly durable!

What I Like…

  • Comfort
  • Support
  • Lightweight 
  • 10mm heel drop
  • Excellent shock absorption

What I Don’t Like…

  • May be too soft
  • Upper can wear easily

Similar Product: Brooks Women’s Revel 4

3. Mizuno Wave Rider 24 – Best For Wide Feet

Mizuno Wave Rider 24
  • Mizuno WAVE: The Mizuno wave Plate disperses energy from impact to a broader area providing a stable platform and a superior cushioning
  • U4ic Midsole: delivers optimal shock reduction, durability, and a superior ride.  innovatively light, well cushioned, responsive, and resilient
  • Smoothride: creates a smooth transition from heel to toe on every step

This shoe is absolutely amazing for people that need a neutral shoe and have wide feet. I found that Mizuno’s Wave Plate design did a fabulous job at preventing shock from radiating through my foot and did not exacerbate my tendonitis.

For those suffering from peroneal tendonitis, the durable and grippy outsole provides a great foundation for recovery. Thanks to the U4ic midsole, I genuinely felt as if I was running on clouds.

Additionally, the high heel drop assures your foot strikes in the proper place. Lastly, for those who need a wider shoe, the Mizuno Wave Rider is perfect for extra room, without lacking support. 

What I Like…

  • Cushioned heel
  • Ideal for wide feet
  • U4ic midsole
  • Lightweight
  • 12mm heel drop

What I Don’t Like…

  • Lack of stability
  • Runs large

Similar Product: ASICS Men’s Gel-Venture 7

4. Saucony Cohesion 13 – Best Fit

Sale
Saucony Cohesion 13
  • Grid technology with VersaFoam cushioning
  • Durable rubber outsole for even your toughest workouts

This shoe is great for a wide variety of runners. Peroneal tendonitis sufferers will love the Saucony for its cushioning and 12mm heel drop, as well as its breathable upper.

The overall fit is amazing and feels like a snug hug around your feet, giving you the ample support you need. I love how flexible and stable these shoes are without being stiff.

And thanks to the VERSARUN technology, this shoe features impressive comfort and adequate shock absorption. Finally, I appreciate how lightweight they are, which helps with the overall pain of tendonitis without weighing you down. Score!

What I Like…

  • Overall support
  • Breathable upper
  • Excellent cushioning
  • Lightweight
  • 12mm heel drop

What I Don’t Like… 

● Runs small

Similar Product: Brooks Women’s Glycerin 19 Neutral Running Shoe

5. Brooks Ghost 13 – Best for Stability

Brooks Ghost 13
  • THIS WOMEN'S SHOE IS FOR: The Ghost 13 is for runners looking for a reliable shoe that's soft and smooth. The Ghost 13 offers improved transitions for zero distractions so you can focus more on what matters most: your run. This Brooks Ghost 13 is a certified PDAC A5500 Diabetic shoe and has been granted the APMA Seal of Acceptance.
  • SUPPORT AND CUSHION: The neutral support type provides high energizing cushioning. Ideal for road running, cross training, the gym or wherever you might want to take them! Predecessor: Ghost 12
  • BALANCED, SOFT CUSHIONING: BioMoGo DNA and DNA LOFT cushioning work together to provide a just-right softness underfoot without losing responsiveness and durability - yet it feels lighter than ever.

The Brooks Ghost 13 is ideal for most runners with peroneal tendonitis, offering a high heel drop and a smooth and easy transition to push off. This shoe is extremely lightweight, responsive, and great for overall comfort.

The cushioning of the Ghost 13 is supportive and balanced across the entire midsole. In addition to supportive cushioning, the Brooks Ghost has a rubber outsole that is very grippy, assuring your run will be slip-free!

At last, it is vital for shoes to fit snugly and support the foot in order to prevent pain from your peroneal tendonitis, and I can guarantee the Brooks Ghost is one of the coziest and secure shoes you can find!

What I Like…

  • Stability
  • Lightweight
  • Comfortable
  • Supportive
  • 12mm heel drop

What I Don’t Like… 

  • Size runs small
  • Not ideal for wider feet

Similar Product: Brooks Women’s PureFlow 7

How To Choose The Best Shoes For Peroneal Tendonitis

Arch & Heel Support

Peroneal Tendonitis is most common in people with low or neutral arches. Be sure to look for shoes with neutral or high arch support that will help guide your stride and in turn reduce pressure on the outer foot.

Comfort 

Highly cushioned running shoes provide you with an ideal amount of shock absorption as well as bounce to aid in push-off. Both will help alleviate repeated pressure on the outside of your foot that causes tendonitis pain. 

Flexibility

Choose shoes with a high level of forefoot and midfoot flexibility to assure the proper range of motion and to propel you forward.

High Heel To Toe Drop

Shoes with a heel drop of 8-12 mm are ideal to help you comfortably strike the pavement heel first. This ideal heal drop allows for a smooth stride during push-off and keeps you from running on your toes- preventing further stress on the tendons.

FAQ’s 

What Causes Peroneal Tendonitis?

One of the most common causes of peroneal tendonitis is an overuse of the tendons. This typically occurs when you engage in heightened levels of activity such as running over long distances, or intense interval training.

Runners are also more likely to develop peroneal tendonitis if they have high arches, are prone to ankle sprains, or have tight calf muscles. Repetitive running on sloped streets can also cause this condition.

Other possible causes to be aware of:

  1. Training errors
  2. Poor footwear selection  (we can help with this one!)
  3. Poor running technique

Can I Run With Peroneal Tendonitis?

In this article, James Dunne explains that “While continuing to run with peroneal tendonitis is usually painful, it’s not impossible. If your tendon pain follows a predictably reactive pattern of becoming more painful after a run then settling quickly in the next 36 hours, it should be ok to run on… if you can handle the discomfort.”

He also advises watching the video below, in which Dr. Christopher Segler shares some practical advice for running with peroneal tendonitis.

What Are The Best Exercises For Peroneal Tendonitis?

The best exercises to relieve peroneal tendonitis include gentle exercises and stretches, which can help strengthen the tendons and surrounding areas during recovery. 

These include:

  • Standing calf stretch
  • Towel stretch
  • Heel raises
  • Plantar fascia stretch
  • Ankle flexion

Check out this article for exercise examples.

Talk To A Doctor For Professional Medical Advice

As always: Talk to a doctor for professional medical advice. 

This article is in no way a substitute for medical advice. And if you or somebody you know is in pain, it’s always best to seek professional help from an expert. 

Final Verdict 

If you suffer from peroneal tendonitis, choosing a good pair of running shoes may allow you to get back on the trails and do what you love. Proper and supportive footwear, like the Asics Gel-Nimbus 22 can provide great relief. 

The reason I recommend these shoes is because of their comfortable, stable, and impressively supportive design.